Category Archives: Industry News

Wiring Matters Issue 84 – March 2021

It’s time to take a look what’s inside Issue 84 (March 2021) of Wiring Matters.

Estimating the age of an electrical installation

This article by Richard Giddings (IEng MIET ACIBSE) looks at how useful it is to be able to establish the approximate age of an electrical installation, whether needing this information for reporting purposes, work or just plain curiosity. Electrical testing alone is insufficient to give an installation’s exact age although, in some instances, it can assist. Instead, recognizing certain details will be a great skill which can be honed by experience.

Island mode earthing arrangements: New Guidance in the Second Edition of the IET Code of Practice on Electrical Energy Storage Systems

Introducing the concept of prosumer’s electrical installations (PEIs), and operating modes for a electrical energy storage systems (EESS) and examining the earthing arrangements for island mode operation for PEIs with EESS. By Graham Kenyon CEng MIET and Dr Andrew F Crossland CEng PhD.

The all-new 5th edition of the IET Code of Practice for In-Service Inspection and Testing of Electrical Equipment

In this article, James Eade, author of the 5th edition, continues his brief insight into the changes to this important Code, now available from the IET.

Broken PEN

Don’t panic, this article is not about broken ballpoint pens, it is concerning broken PEN conductors in PME earthing arrangements. By Michael Peace CEng MIET.

The history of colour identification of conductors

We consider identification of conductors by colour as the norm today, but it wasn’t always the case, as prior to 1916 conductors were not typically identified by colour. By Michael Peace CEng MIET.

Wiring Matters – Issue 81 – July 2020

Wiring Matters – Issue 81 – July 2020

Here is what you will find in the July 2020 (Issue 81) of the IET Wiring Matters magazine.

History of insulation resistance testing

There has been a lot of activity on the IET Engineering Communities forum recently regarding the background of the 1 megohm minimum value for insulation resistance. Let’s take a look at how this value was arrived at in BS 7671:2018+A1:2020.

Draft for Public Comment: IET Code of Practice for Electrical Energy Storage Systems, 2nd Edition

The IET are happy to announce that the Draft for Public Comment for IET Code of Practice for Electrical Energy Storage Systems 2nd Edition is now live.

This Code of Practice looks at Electrical Energy Storage System (EESS) applications and provides information for practitioners to safely and effectively specify, design, install, commission, operate and maintain a system. This 2nd Edition has been updated to take account of developments in the industry, and progress in standardisation.

The all-new 5th Edition of the IET Code of Practice for In-Service Inspection and Testing of Electrical Equipment

In this article, James Eade, author of the 5th Edition, gives a brief insight into the changes to this important Code, due for publication later this year.

Amps per Pound

The idea of sizing a cable to reduce energy loss in distribution is nothing new and has been considered for many years, but with competitive tendering for work and the continual search for cost reductions (also known as ‘value engineering’), the modern design of an electrical installation tries to reduce the materials utilised to a minimum.

Asbestos guidance for electricians

Asbestos was widely used in building construction, both as a building material and for its useful insulation and fire protection properties, for many years during the 20th century.

Its use was progressively reduced between the 1970s and 1999 when all remaining forms were finally prohibited in the UK with the implementation of the Asbestos (Prohibitions) (Amendment) Regulations 1999. Asbestos has also been removed from various properties over the years for various reasons, for example, because of damaged material, or for refurbishment and demolition, but a substantial proportion of the original products still remain. These materials, if undetected, can present an ongoing risk to workers carrying out building repair and maintenance or improvement and refurbishment work. Workers at potential risk include electricians and other building trades. 

Code of Practice for Electric Vehicle Charging Equipment Installation (3rd Edition)

This Code of Practice provides a clear overview of EV charging equipment, as well as setting out the considerations needed prior to installation and the necessary physical and electrical installation requirements. It also details what needs to be considered when installing electric vehicle charging equipment in various different locations – such as domestic dwellings, on-street locations, and commercial and industrial premises.

Key changes from the second edition include:

  • Two completely new sections
    • Vehicles as Energy Storage
    • Integration with smart metering and control, automation and monitoring systems
  • A new Annex
  • A complete update to the new requirements in BS 7671:2018
  • Bringing the Code in line with revised regulations and good practice

The risk assessments and checklists have also been reviewed and revised.

This very well established Code of Practice, supported by all the major stakeholders in the industry, is essential reading for anyone involved in the rapid expansion of EV charging points, and those involved in maintenance, extension, modification and periodic verification of electrical installations that incorporate EV charging.

UK Government doubles funding for on-street electric car charging

  • Transport Secretary announces extra £2.5 million for chargepoints on residential streets
  • extra funding means people who don’t have their own off-street parking will have better access to charging infrastructure near home
  • investment in charging infrastructure will support UK’s move towards net zero emissions by 2050 and efforts to further improve air quality

Owning and charging an electric vehicle is set to become more convenient than ever thanks to an additional £2.5 million to fund the installation of over 1,000 new chargepoints, Transport Secretary Grant Shapps announced today (Monday 12 August 2019).

The funding will support the on-street residential chargepoint scheme, launched in 2017, which helps people access charging infrastructure near their homes when they don’t have off-street parking. It will go towards helping local authorities to install these chargepoints, which can be built into existing structures like lamp-posts. The scheme aims to encourage even more people to choose an electric vehicle by making it easier to charge their cars near home, following a 158% increase in battery electric vehicle sales compared to July last year.

The scheme has already seen 16 local authorities prepared to install 1,200 chargepoints this year. The Transport Secretary is now doubling funding for the popular scheme to meet demand and accelerate the take-up of electric vehicles as the UK moves towards net zero emissions by 2050 and further improve air quality.

Transport Secretary Grant Shapps said:

It’s fantastic that there are now more than 20,000 publicly accessible chargepoints and double the number of electric vehicle chargepoints than petrol stations, but we want to do much more.

It’s vital that electric vehicle drivers feel confident about the availability of chargepoints near their homes, and that charging an electric car is seen as easy as plugging in a smartphone.

That’s why we are now doubling the funding available for local authorities to continue building the infrastructure we need to super-charge the zero emission revolution – right across the country.

The allocation of funding for on-street residential chargepoints is part of the £1.5 billion investment underpinned by the Road to Zero Strategy. The strategy consists of one of the most comprehensive packages of support for the transition to zero emission vehicles in the world, supporting the move towards a cleaner, greener, accessible and reliable UK transport network.

As part of this, the government is also investing £37 million into British engineering to develop electric chargepoint infrastructure that could rapidly expand the UK chargepoint network for people without off-street parking and put the UK on the map as the best place in the world to own an electric vehicle.

Innovations to receive investment include underground charging systems, solar powered charging forecourts and wireless charging projects. Much like current mobile phone technology, wireless charging could mean an end to needing to plug your electric vehicle in.

Electric car chargepoints to be installed in all future homes in world first

All new-build homes could soon be fitted with an electric car chargepoint, the government has outlined today (15 July 2019) in a public consultation on changing building regulations in England. The consultation comes alongside a package of announcements to support electric vehicle drivers and improve the experience of charging.

The proposals aim to support and encourage the growing uptake of electric vehicles within the UK by ensuring that all new homes with a dedicated car parking space are built with an electric chargepoint, making charging easier, cheaper and more convenient for drivers.

The legislation would be a world first, and complements wider investment and measures the government has put in place to ensure the UK has one of the best electric vehicle infrastructure networks in the world – as part of the £1.5 billion Road to Zero Strategy.

The government has also set out today that it wants to see all newly installed rapid and higher powered chargepoints provide debit or credit card payment by Spring 2020.

Transport Secretary Chris Grayling said:

With record levels of ultra-low emission vehicles on our roads, it is clear there is an appetite for cleaner, greener transport.

Home charging provides the most convenient and low-cost option for consumers – you can simply plug your car in to charge overnight as you would a mobile phone.

The government has already taken steps to ensure that existing homes are electric vehicle ready by providing up to £500 off the costs of installing a chargepoint at home.

Having supported the installation of almost 100,000 domestic chargepoints through grant support schemes, the government has also announced that it is consulting on requirements that all new private chargepoints use ‘smart’ technology.

This means an electric vehicle would charge at different times of the day in response to signals, such as electricity tariff information. This would encourage off-peak charging, keeping costs down for consumers.

The consultation proposes using powers under the Automated and Electric Vehicles Act to require most new chargepoints to have smart functionality and meet minimum standards. It also launches a call for evidence on the longer-term options for smart charging.

For more information on electric vehicles and chargepoints, visit www.goultralow.com.