Tag Archives: IET

Code of Practice for Electric Vehicle Charging Equipment Installation (3rd Edition)

This Code of Practice provides a clear overview of EV charging equipment, as well as setting out the considerations needed prior to installation and the necessary physical and electrical installation requirements. It also details what needs to be considered when installing electric vehicle charging equipment in various different locations – such as domestic dwellings, on-street locations, and commercial and industrial premises.

Key changes from the second edition include:

  • Two completely new sections
    • Vehicles as Energy Storage
    • Integration with smart metering and control, automation and monitoring systems
  • A new Annex
  • A complete update to the new requirements in BS 7671:2018
  • Bringing the Code in line with revised regulations and good practice

The risk assessments and checklists have also been reviewed and revised.

This very well established Code of Practice, supported by all the major stakeholders in the industry, is essential reading for anyone involved in the rapid expansion of EV charging points, and those involved in maintenance, extension, modification and periodic verification of electrical installations that incorporate EV charging.

New amendment to BS 7671 (IET Wiring Regulations) Amendment 1

The IET has announced a new amendment to BS 7671:2018 (IET Wiring Regulations 18th Edition). The national Wiring Regulations committee, JPEL/64, agreed the publication of Amendment 1, which will consist of a stand-alone update to Section 722: Electric Vehicle Charging Installations.

The amendment, which is due to publish in early 2020, will be free to view on the IET website, and only form part of a consolidated new Regulations following the next major amendment to BS 7671, expected in 2022.

The amendment follows advances in technology that were not available when BS 7671:2018 published, enabling a more practical solution for the installation of charging points. Functionality built directly into charging equipment uses existing technology, but employed in a new way, allowing charging points to be deployed more widely than ever before.

The updated Section 722 will make installing charging points quicker and easier, and will reduce the cost of installations for both installers and consumers.

The UK government is investing £400 million to accelerate the roll-out of charging infrastructure to help meet its target of at least 50% of new car sales to be ultra-low emission by 2030*.

Mark Coles, Head of Technical Regulations at the IET, is proud of the way that JPEL/64 has been able to respond to the changes in technology. He explains: “JPEL/64 has been able to address a new opportunity for electric vehicle charging equipment that provides a practical, cost-saving solution benefiting industry, consumers and government alike, to help the UK lead the way in the roll-out of infrastructure to support the electric vehicle revolution.

“This update to the IET Wiring Regulations puts the electrical industry at the forefront of driving technological innovation to ensure the installation of practical, safe charging points that are accessible to all.

“By producing Amendment 1 to BS 7671:2018 as a stand-alone, free-to-view document, this updated Section 722 will reach industry much quicker than a full, consolidated amendment would allow, enabling installers to take advantage of BS 7671:2018+A1:2020 as soon as possible.”

Keep an eye on theiet.org/updates to for information on the Draft for Public Comment and publication information.

Proposed timeline

  • 04 September 2019: Amendment 1 approved by JPEL/64
  • October 2019: The Draft for Public Comment for Amendment 1 will be available for 60 days to allow industry to respond to the proposed changes (see theiet.org/updates for details)
  • January 2020: Amendment 1 will publish as a free-to-view document on the IET website and come immediately into effect, eschewing the usual 6-month adjustment period to ensure industry can immediately take advantage of the changes

Wiring Matters – Issue 77 September 2019

Lets take a look at what was in Wiring Matters – Issue 77 September 2019

Brief introduction to the deployment of medical IT systems

Patients undergoing acute care in healthcare establishments (such as hospitals) require enhanced reliability and safety of the electrical installation as well as the safe and reliable operation of the medical electrical (ME) equipment used. This is to provide security of supplies and minimize the risk of electric shock.

BS 7671:2018 Frequently Asked Questions

The IET’s technical helpline receives a wide range of frequently asked questions. Here are just a few of the common questions received.

Setting the Standard

This article explores a brief history of standardization, the current process of standardization and why it is so important for our industry today.

IET announces new amendment to BS 7671 (IET Wiring Regulations)

The IET has announced a new amendment to BS 7671:2018 (IET Wiring Regulations 18th Edition). The national Wiring Regulations committee, JPEL/64, today agreed the publication of Amendment 1, which will consist of a stand-alone update to Section 722: Electric Vehicle Charging Installations.

Solar & Storage Live

The IET are pleased to announce that they are partnering with Solar & Storage Live again this year (17th – 19th September, NEC Birmingham).

Which RCD Type?

Residual Current Devices (RCDs) are safety switching devices. They are designed to provide safety for three types of protection, this section takes a look at them.

Setting the Standard continued, A-Deviations

In the previous article (Setting the Standard- Issue 77) they briefly described the process of standardisation from international to national level. One area that they did not discuss in detail relates to a situation a national committee is faced with when an EN or HD cannot be implemented at national level.

Wiring Matters – Issue 74 March 2019

In the March 2019 issue they welcome back James Eade’s Mythbusting column, he will brief you on the developments of IEC 60364-8-2 and investigate the importance of working safely with storage.

Here is a quick look at what you can expect to find in this issue :-

Mythbusters #3 – All electrical appliances in the workplace should be tested annually

As myths go, this is a well-established one. A cursory glance at any item of electrical equipment in the workplace is very likely to reveal a green sticker indicating that the testing interval is annual, but should it be? As the IET Code of Practice for In-service Inspection and Testing of Electrical Equipment undergoes revision in preparation for a 5th Edition, James Eade delves into the archives to look at the rationale for testing and where such established practice comes from.

Working safely with storage: It’s not business as usual

Two near misses within the past 18 months have been a timely reminder of unique safety procedures for electrical energy storage systems –
Dr Andrew Crossland CEng and EUR ING Graham Kenyon CEng

Lecturing on the 18th Edition of the IET Wiring Regulations in Cyprus

The publication of the 18th Edition of the IET Wiring Regulations has created a surge in demand for local network events to provide updates and insight into the new and amended requirements. The IET Cyprus network requested a visit from a member of the IET Technical Regulations team to give lectures on the main technical changes and new requirements of the 18th Edition of the Wiring Regulations in Nicosia and Limassol and I was happy to volunteer to do them – By: Leon Markwell

Latest developments in International Standards for prosumers low-voltage electrical installations

In October 2018, a new standard, IEC 60364-8-2, was published. In this article, we give a brief overview of some of the latest requirements at international level, which may or may not be incorporated in BS 7671 in the future – By: Geoff Cronshaw

Crabtree: 1919 to 2019 and beyond

Electrical safety has always been at the heart of everything Crabtree does. It’s a philosophy that has seen the brand through periods of depression, a world war, and market uncertainty. It enables them to consistently deliver products and devices that installers can trust, and it all started with a ‘dolly’. (Sponsored)

Read the full issue here – https://electrical.theiet.org/wiring-matters/issues/74/

Order Now – Eighteenth Edition – BS 7671:2018 (Electrical Regulations)

You can now order your copy of the Requirements for Electrical Installations, IET Wiring Regulations, Eighteenth Edition, BS 7671:2018 (Electrical Regulations) and the On-Site Guide (BS 7671:2018) (Electrical Regulations) 

Requirements for Electrical Installations, IET Wiring Regulations, Eighteenth Edition, BS 7671:2018 (Electrical Regulations)

The IET Wiring Regulations are of interest to all those concerned with the design, installation and maintenance of electric wiring in buildings. The market includes electricians, electrical contractors, consultants, local authorities, surveyors and architects. This book will also be of interest to professional engineers, as well as students at university and further education colleges. All users of the IET Wiring Regulations need to be aware of the coming changes in the 18th Edition (BS 7671:2018). This is intended to come into effect on 1st January 2019, although industry needs to start preparing for this from its point of publication (2nd July 2018).

On-Site Guide (BS 7671:2018) (Electrical Regulations) Spiral-bound – 2 Jul 2018

The On-Site Guide is an essential guide to BS 7671. It incorporates the extensive changes in BS 7671:2018, making this a vital guide for keeping up to date. It enables the competent electrician to deal with installations (up to 100 A, 3-phase) providing essential information in a convenient, easy-to-use format. The 18th Edition IET Wiring Regulations publishes in July 2018 and comes into effect on 1st January 2019. All new installations from this point must comply with BS 7671:2018.

     

All above links on this page offer you the ability to order the above publications via Amazon directly.